R E F U G E E S

 

 

 

PDF report: http://www.iraqslogger.com/downloads/unhcr_april2007.pdf


UPDATE 01 JULY 2007

The Iraqi Red Crescent Organization (Iraqi RC) provides relief and humanitarian assistance to the Iraqi families who have been displaced internally and externally. The Iraqi RC reaches the displaced people through its offices in all governorates in Iraq as well as through its coordination offices in the neighboring countries. This report provides statistics related to the Iraqi families who are externally displaced. Statistics was obtained through coordination with the Iraqi Embassy in Amman/Jordan, International Non-governmental Organizations and particularly with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)

The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan

1. Number of Externally Displaced Iraqis is 700,000-750,000 persons.

2. Number of registered Iraqi refugees is 30,000.

Iraqi RC Coordination Office in Amman:

Following Samarra' events (February 2006), many Iraqi families left Iraq to neighboring countries. The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan was one of the countries which received displaced Iraqi families. The Iraqi RC Coordination Office in Amman works with UNHCR to follow-up the flow of Iraqi families into Jordan and to identify the main problems facing those families and to contribute to alleviating their suffering. The following are priority areas that were considered in surveys and assessments:

1. Health: Most families endure problems related to the high fees of physicians and medical care, especially during the winter season, and child health care and medical care for the chronically ill who used to receive subsidized monthly medicines in Iraq.

2. Housing/accommodations: The high cost of rented apartments is the main problem facing the Iraqi families. Most families do not have the needed financial resources and are not receiving any support from any humanitarian agencies for accommodations.

3. Renewal of visas/residence permits: Iraqis in Jordan are considered as temporary visitors. Renewal of visas is difficult or limited due to the strict procedures. Many quickly lose their legal status and become subject to deportation. Most Iraqis in Jordan have not been officially recognized as refugees by either the government of Jordan or the UNHCR.

4. Unemployment: Most Iraqis residing in Jordan have limited employment opportunities. There is high unemployment rate even among the highly educated. Without work authorization and with depleted savings, many Iraqis (often over-qualified) seek and/or accept low-paying under the table work or marginal employment.

5. Education: Iraqi children living in Jordan face barriers to education. For Iraqis in Jordan, enrollment in schools or universities is difficult due to the high tuition fees and/or the difficult procedures of the public schools.

6. Newborns: Parents of Iraqi children born in Jordan have the problem of obtaining the Iraqi nationality for their children. Most of these families cannot afford the cost of ground or air travel to Iraq to complete the related official procedures.

7. Food and nutrition: The high cost of food items in Jordan had contributed to the hardships of the Iraqi families.

Iraqi RC assistance provided through Amman Coordination Office: The Amman Coordination Office was inaugurated on 1 February, 2007. Since then, the office coordinated with international organizations and the Iraqi Embassy in Amman to provide humanitarian assistance to the Externally Displaced Iraqis as follows:

1. Assisted in the field survey carried out by a joint team from the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (International Federation) and the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC).

2. Provided financial assistance for the treatment of 100 persons with different medical problems.

3. Provided financial assistance for 100 families to assist in the supply of food items.

4. Provided financial assistance for 50 families in cooperation with the Iraqi Embassy in Jordan.

The Amman Coordination Office will continue its efforts to deliver humanitarian assistance to the Externally

Displaced Iraqis as per regulations of the host country.

Syrian Arab Republic

1. Number of Externally Displaced Iraqis is 1,500,000-2,000,000 persons.

2. Number of registered Iraqi refugees is 15,000.

Iraqi RC Coordination Office in Syria:

The Syrian Arab Republic was another host country for the Externally Displaced Iraqi families. The Iraqi RC Coordination Office in Syria maintains a coordination role with the UNHCR regarding gathering statistics and information related to the displaced Iraqi families, and identifying the main problems facing those families and alleviating their suffering. The following are priority areas that were considered in surveys and assessments:

1. Health: Most families endure problems related to the high fees of physicians and medical care, especially during the winter season, and child health care and medical care for the chronically ill who used to receive subsidized monthly medicines in Iraq.

2. Housing/accommodations: The high cost of rented apartments is the main problem facing the Iraqi families. The vast majority of families does not have the needed financial resources and are not receiving any assistance from any humanitarian agencies for accommodations.

3. Renewal of visas/residence permits: Iraqis in Syria have difficulties in renewing their visas and/or obtaining residence permits due to the large numbers of Iraqi arrivals. Iraqi families became subject to deportation in case of inability to get a residence permit. On the other hand, visa procedures for Syria are less restrictive than those for Jordan.

4. Unemployment: Most Iraqis residing in Syria have limited employment opportunities. Similar to the situation in Jordan, there is high unemployment rate even among the highly educated. Many Iraqis (often over-qualified) seek and/or accept low-paying under the table work or marginal employment.

5. Education: There are more Iraqi children living in Syria than in Jordan. Official procedures related to enrollment in schools and universities are easier than in any other host country.

6. Newborns: Parents of Iraqi children born in Syria have the problem of obtaining the Iraqi nationality for their children. Most of these families cannot afford the cost of ground or air travel to Iraq to complete the related official procedures.

7. Food and nutrition: Most Iraqi families residing in Syria need food and non-food relief assistance. Many Iraqi families obtain food supplies from relatives in Iraq.

Iraqi RC assistance provided through Syria Coordination Office: Since the opening of the Coordination Office in Syria and in cooperation and coordination with UNHCR, the Iraqi RC was able to provide humanitarian assistance to the Externally Displaced Iraqis as follows:

1. Assisted in the field survey carried out by a joint team from the International Federation and the ICRC.

2. Provided financial assistance for the treatment of 20 persons with different medical problems.

Arab Republic of Egypt

1. Number of Externally Displaced Iraqis is 150,000 persons.

2. Number of registered Iraqi refugees is 5,000.

 

Islamic Republic of Iran

Number of Externally Displaced Iraqis in Iran is 100,000 persons.

 

Lebanon

Number of Externally Displaced Iraqis in Lebanon is 40,000 persons.

Full report: http://www.iraqslogger.com/downloads/ICRO_EDP_07_07.pdf


Mapping Displaced: Non-Iraqi Refugees in Iraq
(UNHCR Releases Updated Map Showing Locations of non-Iraqi Displaced in Iraq - July 2007 - see PDF file)


Internally displaced persons in Iraq – update 21 Nov 2020


The Cluster partners are UNHCR (Coordinator), IOM (Deputy Coordinator), UNICEF, WHO, WFP, UNAMI, UNOPS, UN-Habitat, UNFPA, UNDP, ILO, UNIDO and OCHA.

One of the components of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, the ICRC is a neutral, impartial and independent humanitarian organisation that does not take part in the UN's cluster approach, rather it is an observer.

Extract

1.2 Transferred/Displaced Persons Before 2006

- Cut off date 31 December 2020 (1)

The main reasons for displacement before the fall of the former regime included human rights abuses, internal conflict along political, religious and ethnic lines, the Iraq-Iran and Gulf Wars, drainage of the Marshlands, construction of dams in the Centre, suppression of the 1991 uprising in the South, competition over land and natural resources, and the “Arabisation” policies of the former regime. With the fall of the former regime, the US-led invasion and occupation of Iraq, the counter-insurgency operations, and the secondary displacement of Arabs by returning Kurds, were amongst the causes of internal displacement until the end of December 2005. In addition, while many Iraqis returned both internally and from overseas, a considerable number remained internally displaced, primarily due to a lack/destruction of housing, inadequate employment opportunities and social services, the presence of mines/UXO, and property disputes in their areas of return.

Governorate of 

Displacement

Pre 2003 (families)

2003-2005 8

(families)

Total families displaced

Total displaced individuals

Dahuk

22,452

22

22,474

134,844

Erbil 

32,737

76

32,813

196,878

Sulaymaniyah

50,430

35

50,465

302,790

Total North9

105,619

133

105,752

634,512

Ninewa

1,947

4,625

6,572

39,432

Kirkuk

184

1,068

1,252

7,512

Anbar

218

4,685

4,903

29,418

Baghdad 

2,281

1,586

3,867

23,202

Diyala

2,409

6,691

9,100

54,600

Salah al-Din

360

3,006

3,366

20,196

Total Centre10

7,399

21,661

29,060

174,360

Babylon 

654

821

1,475

8,850

Basrah

15,494

284

15,778

94,668

Diwaniya

222

932

1,154

6,924

Kerbala

17,490

1,328

18,818

112,908

Missan

18,465

406

18,871

113,226

Muthanna

424

437

861

5,166

Najaf

3,833

160

3,993

23,958

Thi-Qar

657

3,569

4,226

25,356

Wassit

70

1,960

2,030

12,180

Total South11

57,309

9,897

67,206

403,236

Total families

170,327

31,691

202,018

 

 Total individuals

1,021,962

190,146

 

1,212,108

 

Maps:

Iraq: Internally Displaced Families By Governorate - November 2007

IDPs (FAM) in Iraq - Governorate of Origin for Post Samarra IDPs

Iraq: Ability of IDPs to Transfer PDS Cards by Governorate - Nov. 2007

Iraq: Limitations to Physical Access and Restrictions to Registration of IDPs by Governorate

1 IDP Families by Governorate

            1.1 Internally Displaced Persons after February 2006  

Governorate of   displacement  

Displaced Families – 

November 07 2 

Displaced Individuals  -

 November  07  

Dahuk3

                                 9,617

                       55,151 

Erbil4

                                 6,104

                       34,717 

Sulaymaniyah5

                               13,165

                       73,534 

Total North

                               28,886

                     163,402 

Anbar6

                               10,225

                       61,350 

Baghdad

                               59,346

                     365,618 

Diyala

                               12,796

                       76,601 

Kirkuk

                                 6,604

                       36,315 

Ninewa

                               12,118

                       66,970 

Salah al-Din

                                 5,326

                       31,017 

Total Centre

 106,415

                     637,871 

Babylon

                               10,701

                       65,694 

Basrah

                                 4,158

                       26,110 

Diwaniya

                                 3,577

                       22,336 

Kerbala

                                 8,826

                       57,406 

Missan

                                 5,732

                       39,070 

Muthanna

                                 2,336

                       17,611 

Najaf

                               10,400

                       60,459 

Thi-Qar

                                 6,140

                       40,107 

Wassit

                               11,257

                       69,425 

Total South

                               63,127

                     398,218 

Grand Total families

 198,428

 

Grand Total individuals

 

                  1,199,491 

 

Notes:
(1)This figure is based on data gathered of IDPs in public buildings and collective centres in the three Northern governorates (UNOPS/UNHCR), as well as monitoring and needs assessments of IDPs in the 15 Central and Southern Governorates (IOM). Cluster F is looking into supporting the Iraqi authorities to update this figure and clarify the number of persons still in displacement.

(2) This figure includes IDPs as well as Iraqi refugees from Iran who returned into internal displacement.

(3) These include persons expelled during the 'De-villagisation' campaign, the Anfal campaign, the 'Arabisation' campaign; persons expelled or who fled due to Kurdish in-fighting, as well as those fleeing fighting between the PKK and the Turkish military in Northern Iraq; Kurds expelled to Iran in the 1970s, and who have since returned to Northern Iraq but remain internally displaced; Iraqis of all ethnic and religious backgrounds who fled Government-controlled territory since opposing the Iraqi Government; populations fleeing the Centre of Iraq after the fall of the former regime due to religious/ethnic or political persecution and harassment (e.g. religious minorities, intellectuals, Kurds from Fallujah and Ramadi), as well as ongoing fighting between Coalition Forces/Multinational Forces (MNF-I) and insurgents.

(4) These include Arabs, Kurds, Turkmen and Assyrians displaced to other areas in the Centre during the 1980s as a result of the Iran / Iraq war; Arabs displaced to the Centre since 1991 following the drainage of the Marshes; Arabs displaced from their places of residence in the Centre as part of the 'Arabisation' campaign from the 1960s through to the 1990s; Kurds/Turkmen IDPs returning to the Governorates below the 'Green Line' after the fall of the former government in April 2003; 'Secondary displaced' Arabs fleeing in fear of harassment following the return of Kurds and Turkmen from the North to their places of origin below the former 'Green Line'; Populations displaced due to periodic fighting between Coalition Forces/MNF-I and Iraqi Forces and insurgents (e.g. Fallujah, Ramadi, Samara, Tal Afar, Al Qaim).

(5) These include persons displaced as a result of previous wars, specifically the Iran/Iraq war during the 1980s; Shiites displaced due to political/religious persecution (e.g. the 1991 uprising); Marsh Arabs displaced since 1991 following the draining of the marshes; Smaller numbers of Arabs displaced from their places of residence in the Centre (mainly in April/May 2003); people displaced as a result of tribal and other conflicts in the South; people displaced as a result of natural disasters, specifically floods; populations displaced due to periodic fighting between Coalition Forces/MNF-I and Iraqi Forces, and insurgents or armed militias (e.g. Fallujah, Ramadi, Najaf).


Full_Report (pdf* format - 839,3 Kbytes): http://www.reliefweb.int/rw/RWB.NSF/db900SID/AMMF-79BE2C/$File/Full_Report.pdf


MAPS

26 Nov 2007 UNHCR Iraq: Limitations to Physical Access and Restrictions to Registration of IDPs by Governorate (pdf, 205k)
26 Nov 2007 UNHCR Iraq: Ability of IDPs to Transfer PDS Cards by Governorate - Nov. 2007 (pdf, 170k)
26 Nov 2007 UNHCR IDPs (FAM) in Iraq - Governorate of Origin for Post Samarra IDPs (pdf, 201k)
26 Nov 2007 UNHCR Iraq: Internally Displaced Families By Governorate - November 2007 (pdf, 231k)
29 Oct 2007 Le Monde Les Réfugiés du Proche-Orient (Novembre 2007) (pdf, 801k)
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16 Oct 2007 WHO Cholera in Iraq: Lab Confirmed Cases, 14 August - 5 October 2020 (pdf, 651k)
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